EU pilots AI border agents to mine microexpressions

In 2018, the EU announced iBorderCtrl, a six-month pilot led by the Hungarian National Police to install an automated lie detection test at four border crossing points in Hungary, Latvia, and Greece. The system uses an animated AI border agent that records travellers' faces while asking questions such as "What's in your suitcase?". The AI then analyses the video, scoring each response for 38 microexpressions. Travellers who pass will be issued QR codes to let them through; those who don't will be referred to a human agent. The team behind the system, which includes researchers at Manchester Metropolitan University, believes it will be able to raise the system's accuracy to 85% - but even that rate will swamp the border with misidentified liars if the system is rolled out EU-wide.

https://gizmodo.com/an-ai-lie-detector-is-going-to-start-questioning-travel-1830126881
https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg24032023-400-an-ai-lie-detector-will-interrogate-travellers-at-some-eu-borders/

Writer: Melanie Ehrenkranz; Douglas Heaven
Publication: Gizmodo; New Scientist

What is Privacy International calling for?

People must know

People must be able to know what data is being generated by devices, the networks and platforms we use, and the infrastructure within which devices become embedded.  People should be able to know and ultimately determine the manner of processing.

Limit data analysis by design

As nearly every human interaction now generates some form of data, systems should be designed to limit the invasiveness of data analysis by all parties in the transaction and networking.

Control over intelligence

Individuals should have control over the data generated about their activities, conduct, devices, and interactions, and be able to determine who is gaining this intelligence and how it is to be used.

Identities under our control

Individuals must be able to selectively disclose their identity, generate new identities, pseudonyms, and/or remain anonymous. 

We may challenge consequential decisions

Individuals should be able to know about, understand, question and challenge consequential decisions that are made about them and their environment. This means that controllers too should have an insight into and control over this processing.