Smartphone app monitors mental health status

In March 2018 the Palo Alto startup Mindstrong Health, founded by three doctors, began clinical tests of an app that uses patients' interactions with their smartphones to monitor their mental state. The app, which is being tested on people with serious illness, measures the way patients swipe, tap, and type into their phones; the encrypted baseline and ongoing data is then analysed using machine learning to find patterns that indicate brain disorders such as a relapse into depression, substance abuse, or schizophrenia. A study at the University of Michigan hopes to establish whether the app can help those who are not mentally ill but are at high risk for depression and suicide.

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/612266/the-smartphone-app-that-can-tell-youre-depressed-before-you-know-it-yourself/

writer: Rachel Metz
Publication: Technology Review
 

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