Uber patent proposes AI method for identifying drunk riders

In June 2018, Uber filed a US patent application for technology intended to help the company identify drunk riders by comparing data from new ride requests to past requests made by the same user. Conclusions drawn from data such as the number of typos or the angle at which the rider is holding the phone would determine which, if any, driver they were matched with. What plans the company may have for the technology is unknown; however, critics expressed concerns that it could deter prospective riders from using the service and increase the likelihood that people who have been drinking will take the wheel themselves.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2018/06/12/uber-wants-a-patent-to-tell-if-you-drink-and-ride/

writer: Rachel Siegel
Publication: Washington Post

 

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