Huawei

Case Study

Unwanted Witness, our partner organisation based in Uganda, explore critical questions Huawei's surveillance dealings with the Ugandan government raise. While Huawei's relationship with the government raises concerns for human rights, many of these concerns remain unaddressed.

Case Study

SHARE, an organisation based in Belgrade, are investigating Huawei's dealings with the Serbian government. In this case study, they explain what obstacles they faced and how they used public action to overcome them.

 

News & Analysis

Cloud extraction allows law enforcement agencies to take huge amounts of your data from the Cloud via a legal back door.

Long Read
image from portal gda (cc) Many people are still confused by what is 5G and what it means for them. With cities like London, New York or San Francisco now plastered with ads, talks about national security, and the deployment of 5G protocols being treated like an arms race, what happens to our
News & Analysis
Written by the Foundation for Media Alternatives 7:01: Naomi wakes up and gets ready for the day. 7:58: Naomi books an Uber ride to Bonifacio Global City (BGC), where she has a meeting. She pays with her credit card. While Naomi is waiting for her Uber, she googles restaurant options for her dinner
Long Read
We hate to say we told you so. Privacy International has for years warned that powerful surveillance technologies are used to facilitate serious human rights abuses with insufficient technological and legal safeguards against abuse. We now have the most solid evidence to date that we were right. Our
News & Analysis
The right to privacy is on the frontline of a struggle that has seen a number of other constitutionally protected rights threatened during the last few bloody months of Kenya's ongoing security crisis. After at least 64 people were killed in two attacks by Al Shabaab militants in late 2014, members
News & Analysis
When a product line becomes engulfed in controversy, the PR team's first move is to distance the corporation from the damage. The surveillance market is not immune to this approach, so when companies products are found to be in use by repressive regimes, the decision many boards make is simply to
News & Analysis
In order to lawfully conduct communications surveillance (“lawful interception”) in the U.S. and Western Europe, a law enforcement agency must seek authorisation from a court and produce an order to a network operator or internet service provider, which is then obliged to intercept and then to
News & Analysis
On the surface, it’s all about protecting Russian kids from internet pedophiles. In reality, the Kremlin’s new “Single Register” of banned websites, which goes into effect today, will wind up blocking all kinds of online political speech. And, thanks to the spread of new internet-monitoring