Guides

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Privacy International partnered with the International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School to guide the reader through a simple presentation of the legal arguments explored by national courts around the world who have been tasked with national courts that discuss the negative implications of
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Many countries in the world have existing ID cards - of varying types and prevalence - there has been a new wave in recent years of state “digital identity” initiatives. The systems that states put in place to identify citizens and non-citizens bring with them a great deal of risks. This is
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This section lays out the wide range of arguments challenging identity systems because of their impact on the right to privacy.

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The following section of this guide provides details on these arguments surrounding biometric information which is often an important component of most identity systems.

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This section presents arguments on data protection concerns, highlighting the importance of safeguards to protect rights, and pointing to issues around the role of consent, function creep, and data sharing.

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This section sets out arguments on rights other than privacy, namely liberty, dignity, and equality. It provides detail on the social and economic exclusion and discrimination that can result from the design or implementation of identity systems.

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This section discusses identity systems’ implications for the rule of law, the role of international human rights law, and considerations of gender identity, which are often absent from existing jurisprudence.

Key Resources

This guide is for anyone concerned about their social media accounts being monitored by public authorities, but it’s especially targeted at people from minority and migrant communities who may be disproportionately affected by various forms of surveillance.

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This week we talk to PI's Tech Co-ordination Group to bring you tips and tricks about how to start cleaning up and securing your phone or computer.

Explainer

Top tips on how to Freedom of Information requests from people who actually file FOI requests!

Call to Action

Ask advertisers why they have your data!

Some advertisers upload our personal data to target us on Facebook. Find the ones doing this for you and hold them into account!

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Here are a few suggested tips, based on our own experience with Data Subject Access Requests (DSARs). This is based on DSARs under the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), but we hope our tips may be useful in other jurisdictions too.

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The screenshots below outline some steps you can take to minimise the data you share on WhatsApp. The company announced changes to group privacy (details here) but we are not currently (as of 14/05/19) able to see these changes (PI is UK-based).

It’s tough to minimise targeted ads on phones

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Uber appears to offer few options to limit data collection and it’s unclear how the data the company has about users is shared with third parties including advertisers, although there have been numerous reports about Uber’s data sharing activities. These screenshots show a few things you can do.

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Twitter plays an increasingly important role as a space facilitating democratic engagement, debate and dissent. However, Twitter's track record in relation to protecting people's data has in some instances fallen short of expectations. In August 2019, for example, Twitter revealed that it had shared

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TikTok is a short-form video app (owned by ByteDance) which allows advertising and sponsored content. Two thirds of TikTok’s over 113 million users (are reportedly aged 16-24) and it was the second most downloaded app in 2019, beaten only by WhatsApp’s 849 million). Like other tech platforms

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While Telegram says in its privacy policy that the company doesn’t “use your data for ad targeting or other commercial purposes”, the company says that “no third party bot developers are affiliated with Telegram” and that developers “should ask [users] for [their] permission before they access

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It’s tough to minimise targeted ads on phones because ads can be delivered based on data from the device level (such as what operating system your phone is using or based on unique numbers that identify your phone), browser level (what you search for within a browser), and within the apps you use

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Facebook has been in the news over the past few years for failing to protect users’ data (here are some examples). Facebook can be an important tool in facilitating democracy and provides the potential to spread messages and ideas around the globe. For these reasons, it’s not possible for some

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Google dominates online search. The company also owns YouTube and Android, with the latter reportedly making up nearly 75% of the global smart phone market share. PI has written about the numerous problems that come from corporate concentration and the use of data by monopolistic companies, and

Long Read

Valentine’s Day is traditionally a day to celebrate relationships, but many relationships that begin romantically can quickly become controlling, with partners reading emails, checking texts and locations of social media posts. This can be just the beginning.

Today, Friday 14th February, Privacy International and Women’s Aid are launching a series of digital social media cards giving women practical information on how to help stay safe digitally from control and abuse.

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uBlock Origin is an independant and open-source ad-blocker relying on a currated list of servers. It prevents your browser from connecting to these servers to serve you ads. We recommand it over AdBlock Plus which authorise certain ads to be displayed according to its "Acceptable Ads program". It is